The conflict of law in antigone

Literary Terms Conflict between Human Law and Law of God in Sophocles' Antigone Sophocles' Antigone focuses on the conflict between human law and the law of the gods when following both sets of laws at a time seems to be impossible.

The conflict of law in antigone

Synopsis[ edit ] Prior to the beginning of the play, brothers Eteocles and Polyneices, leading opposite sides in Thebes ' civil war, died fighting each other for the throne.

Creonthe new ruler of Thebes and brother of the former Queen Jocasta, has decided that Eteocles will be honored and Polyneices will be in public shame. The rebel brother's body will not be sanctified by holy rites and will lie unburied on the battlefield, prey for carrion animals like worms and vultures, the harshest punishment at the time.

The conflict of law in antigone and Ismene are the sisters of the dead Polyneices and Eteocles. In the opening of the play, Antigone brings Ismene outside the palace gates late at night for a secret meeting: Antigone wants to bury Polyneices' body, in defiance of Creon's edict.

Ismene refuses to help her, not believing that it will actually be possible to bury their brother, who is under guard, but she is unable to stop Antigone from going to bury her brother herself. Antigone's family tree Creon enters, along with the chorus of Theban elders.

He seeks their support in the days to come and in particular, wants them to back his edict regarding the disposal of Polyneices' body. The leader of the chorus pledges his support out of deference to Creon.

Major Conflicts

A sentry enters, fearfully reporting that the body has been given funeral rites and a symbolic burial with a thin covering of earth, though no one who actually committed the crime saw this. Creon, furious, orders the sentry to find the culprit or face death himself. The sentry leaves, and the chorus sings about honouring the gods, but after a short absence, he returns, bringing Antigone with him.

The sentry explains that the watchmen uncovered Polyneices' body and then caught Antigone as she did the funeral rituals. Creon questions her after sending the sentry away, and she does not deny what she has done. She argues unflinchingly with Creon about the immorality of the edict and the morality of her actions.

Creon becomes furious, and seeing Ismene upset, thinks she must have known of Antigone's plan. Ismene tries to confess falsely to the crime, wishing to die alongside her sister, but Antigone will not have it.

Creon orders that the two women be temporarily imprisoned. HaemonCreon's son, enters to pledge allegiance to his father, even though he is engaged to Antigone.

He initially seems willing to forsake Antigone, but when Haemon gently tries to persuade his father to spare Antigone, claiming that "under cover of darkness the city mourns for the girl", the discussion deteriorates, and the two men are soon bitterly insulting each other. When Creon threatens to execute Antigone in front of his son, Haemon leaves, vowing never to see Creon again.

Creon decides to spare Ismene and to bury Antigone alive in a cave. By not killing her directly, he hopes to pay the minimal respects to the gods. She is brought out of the house, and this time, she is sorrowful instead of defiant.

She expresses her regrets at not having married and dying for following the laws of the gods.

The conflict of law in antigone

She is taken away to her living tomb, with the Leader of the Chorus expressing great sorrow for what is going to happen to her. Tiresiasthe blind prophet, enters.

Tiresias warns Creon that Polyneices should now be urgently buried because the gods are displeased, refusing to accept any sacrifices or prayers from Thebes. Creon accuses Tiresias of being corrupt.

Tiresias responds that because of Creon's mistakes, he will lose "a son of [his] own loins" [2] for the crimes of leaving Polyneices unburied and putting Antigone into the earth he does not say that Antigone should not be condemned to death, only that it is improper to keep a living body underneath the earth.

All of Greece will despise Creon, and the sacrificial offerings of Thebes will not be accepted by the gods. The leader of the chorus, terrified, asks Creon to take Tiresias' advice to free Antigone and bury Polyneices.

Creon assents, leaving with a retinue of men.The Conflict over Political and Natural Law In Sophocles’ tragedy Antigone there are many major political conflicts present. Some of these include the role of women in politics, claims of justice versus claims of the family, individualism versus patriotism, the state versus religion, and obligation to the versus the obligation to ones conscience among others.

Nov 02,  · The conflict of 'Antigone' is the conflict between the manmade laws of the State and the god-given laws of justice; morality; and rites, rituals, and traditions. The laws of the State are represented by Theban King Creon's decree that the disloyal Theban dead are to be left above ground and exposed to the elements, dogs, and attheheels.com: Resolved.

The major moral conflict in Antigone by Sophocles is the conflict over which value is most fundamental. The play presents the moral conflict over whether the god’s law or the city’s law is more powerful.

This seems to be the most prominent theme.

The conflict arises mainly between the tragic. The second conflict can be described as following ones conscience and ideals versus following the law strictly. In this conflict Antigone makes decisions based on her conscience and ideals while Creon is the strict law abiding king.

Finally, the main and most important discord, which is similar to the second conflict, is the debate of moral . Conflict between Human Law and Law of God in Sophocles' Antigone Sophocles' Antigone focuses on the conflict between human law and the law of the gods .

- Antigone - Pride and Conflict of Law Sophocles' Antigone, in its later phases is no longer about the conflict of law; It is about stubbornness and self will, about the sin of refusing to listen; about a man who has never been told. Conflict of law, presents the initial disturbance within Thebes.

Creon, King of Thebes, refuses to bury the body.

Conflict in Antigone by Kathleen Prezi on Prezi